Summer Advantage Show Impressive Academic Gains for 2013

Posted by: Summit54 Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Summer Advantage Updates

January
7

ASPEN, CO– This past summer, for the second year in a row, the RE-1 School District was involved in a collaborative summer school initiative with local education foundation Summit 54 and Mile High United Way Denver called Summer Advantage USA.

Summer Advantage USA is a nationally acclaimed, summer school initiative aimed at preventing summer learning loss and improving academic success.
National research shows that summer learning loss’ attributes to 66% of the achievement gap in America. The free five-week Summer Advantage program includes breakfast and lunch, bus transportation, weekly speakers and field trips. Students spend the morning reading, writing and studying math, and in the afternoon participate in creative and learning-based projects, such as science experiments, dance, music and art. On Fridays scholars went on field trips to many of the areas non-profits. Summer Advantage also hosted a Children’s College Fair. Each school site completed a “community service” project. Summer Advantage is privately funded in the Roaring Fork Valley by Summit 54, in cooperation with the RE-1 School District.

In 2012, the program served 410 Kindergarten through 3rd grade students at Basalt, Sopris and Glenwood Springs Elementary Schools. This summer the program expanded to 779 scholars and added a new site at Crystal River Elementary School.

Summer Advantage conducts rigorous evaluations of their program. Summer Advantage scholars in the RE-1 School District progressed further in mathematics, reading and language skills than the national average. Students gained 2.9 months of math skills and 2.7 months of reading skills over the 5-week period. Crystal River Elementary, the program’s newest site showed impressive results

An evaluation was also conducted to assess the organization’s impact on major factors linked to student achievement: academic improvement; parental and scholar engagement and teacher satisfaction. Scholars’ vocabulary, word analysis, reading, writing, computation, math concepts, and problem solving skills were

ASPEN, CO– This past summer, for the second year in a row, the RE-1 School District was involved in a collaborative summer school initiative with local education foundation Summit 54 and Mile High United Way Denver called Summer Advantage USA. Summer Advantage USA is a nationally acclaimed, summer school initiative aimed at preventing summer learning loss and improving academic success. National research shows that summer learning loss’ attributes to 66% of the achievement gap in America. The free five-week Summer Advantage program includes breakfast and lunch, bus transportation, weekly speakers and field trips. Students spend the morning reading, writing and studying math, and in the afternoon participate in creative and learning-based projects, such as science experiments, dance, music and art. On Fridays scholars went on field trips to many of the areas non-profits. Summer Advantage also hosted a Children’s College Fair. Each school site completed a “community service” project. Summer Advantage is privately funded in the Roaring Fork Valley by Summit 54, in cooperation with the RE-1 School District.

In 2012, the program served 410 Kindergarten through 3rd grade students at Basalt, Sopris and Glenwood Springs Elementary Schools. This summer the program expanded to 779 scholars and added a new site at Crystal River Elementary School.

Summer Advantage conducts rigorous evaluations of their program. Summer Advantage scholars in the RE-1 School District progressed further in mathematics, reading and language skills than the national average. Students gained 2.9 months of math skills and 2.7 months of reading skills over the 5-week period. Crystal River Elementary, the program’s newest site showed impressive results

An evaluation was also conducted to assess the organization’s impact on major factors linked to student achievement: academic improvement; parental and scholar engagement and teacher satisfaction. Scholars’ vocabulary, word analysis, reading, writing, computation, math concepts, and problem solving skills were

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